Thank you Suzanne Brockmann…

Honest, genuine, real, and oh how I wish I had been there to hear these words delivered!!!

News from Suz Brockmann
http://www.SuzanneBrockmann.com
July 21, 2018, Denver, Colorado


There’s been a bit of buzz about my RWA LTA acceptance speech…

And I’d hoped the video would be up so you could watch it, but I think that takes a bit of time to do (and the gang over at RWA are a little busy with the rest of the giant conference), so I thought I’d zap you a quick e-newsletter with the contents of my speech… read more

https://tinyletter.com/SuzanneBrockmann/letters/that-rwa-lta-speech-news-from-suz

Finding The Positive in Mother’s Day

Social media, and media in general have blown Mother’s Day up into a two day event… and then some… making it harder and harder on those who don’t have mothers worthy of celebration, and those who have lost mothers they miss every day of their lives.

I’m one of the former.

Over the years, I’ve simply ignored all the wonderful posts about mothers who are loved, missed, and celebrated, but for some reason this year it was more difficult to stuff my feelings into a tidy little slot and just keep moving forward.

The problem began with hearing one of those radio deals where listeners phone in and have twenty seconds to say something to their mom—for all the world to hear.

I laughed at the first few, thinking, ha ha, nope, nothing like my mother. Then a young woman said, “If not for my mother, I wouldn’t be the person I am today.”

At that point I started to think of the negatives in my life I could directly attribute to my parents. If not for my mother I wouldn’t be…

But I stopped, because I have learned to live a positive life…I gave up negative when I realized it was a legacy I didn’t want, didn’t have to accept.

Today, I refused to dwell on the why’s behind my shortcomings and weaknesses.

Instead, I chose to look at, think about, and question how the negatives in my childhood impacted me in a positive way, and here are a few that stand out.

If I’d had a mother who got up in the mornings and got her children off to school, would I be such a good self-starter? Would I still be crazy proficient and organized if I hadn’t had to get my own breakfast, get dressed, and on my way?

Probably not.

If I’d had parents I could run to when the bumps and scrapes and hurt feelings happened would I still be this resilient and self-sufficient?

If I’d had parents who put their children first, would I be such a strong and independent woman today?

If I hadn’t had parents who expected me to work as soon as I was legally able, would I have such and outstanding work ethic?

If I hadn’t had parents who bought me a horse so I wouldn’t be interested in boys, and so they had a tool to hold over my head (If you do that we’ll sell your horse. If you don’t do this, we’ll sell your horse. If your grades…) would I have had such a fantastic career as a horse trainer? Would my future have been decided by a boyfriend and not by my own pursuit of happiness?

If my father hadn’t bought himself a puppy, one who grew up to be a dog who loved me, and who I loved with all my heart, would I have had this life blessed with loving and loveable 4-legged creatures?

Maybe, maybe not.

Bottom line? There was always food in the cupboards, a clean bed to sleep in, and a roof over my head… And that’s a helluva lot more than some kids had, so for that I am grateful.

And when Mother’s Day and Father’s Day threaten to overwhelm those of us with seemingly little to celebrate, I remember the gift of independence, of strength, and of resilience. And I think about the sheer joy of loving and caring for animals.

I grew up on my own, and somewhere along the line I found out that I’m naturally compassionate, and although I built a wall around my feelings at a very young age, I have a soft heart.

Today I celebrate the positives that came from parents who had no clue how to love, nurture, and protect their children.

I have a great life, lived in a positive way, and I am grateful!

Savvy Characters are NEVER “too stupid to live”

How the heck do you create a character with flaws, and put her in dangerous situations while avoiding this ugly misstep?

  • By learning how to brilliantly navigate dicey situations
  • By discovering how an emergency situation could/should/might unfold
  • By understanding how to be prepared for… read more

I thought all children had nightmares…

As a child I had few possessions because we didn’t have a lot of money. But my parents owned our home, so that made us rich. And my mother had things. Important things like china and silver and a fur coat.

Long before I was five I could properly set a table with two forks, two spoons, a knife, a water goblet, a bread and butter plate, and a napkin I could fold in special ways.

I slept with my hair tightly pin curled on the nights before special occasions.

At Christmas there was always a new nightie, and a special dress because my mother was a talented seamstress. And there was at least one special gift under the tree for each of us. Plus a few other things like doll clothes and socks.

I was well fed (in spite of hating vegetables). Had a roof over my head, a bedroom of my own once I turned nine, and a big yard to play in. I considered the dog mine, and spent a great deal of time with her when she wasn’t wandering off to visit the neighbors.

I was a bright child who never had a problem with school, and played well alone or with others, but most of all I loved to escape into books.

I never spoke to an adult unless spoken too, my manners were impeccable, and I don’t recall misbehaving, although I must have selective memory because I do remember getting spanked with some frequency and crying like my heart had been broken.

And I had terrible nightmares. I thought all children had nightmares. Many, many, years later I learned otherwise…

…to be continued…


Dusty, from Into the Sunrise, had nightmares too. And she didn’t know her childhood was any different from the other children in her school.
She was well off, her father told her so, and she had a bedroom of her own, and horses to ride. And she secretly sat out on the porch sometimes at night where she could hold the nightmares at bay while she listened to the sounds of creatures rustling in the long grass…

 


How about you? Did you have nightmares as a kid?


 

Finding My Way

Today I begin a new project.

Today I begin talking, publicly, about why my characters are so flawed, and why they have so much to overcome before they find happiness.

Why now?

Because it’s finally time, and because today I released, INTO THE SUNRISE, a story I’m passionate about. A story about a woman who overcomes enormous obstacles, and learns to celebrate her own strength.

It reminds me of who I am.

And it reminds me of everyone else out there who has struggled to overcome.

So bear with me for a few days, while I explore what it meant to me, to finally realize I was from a dysfunctional family.


From shattered dreams to incredible joy.

Soul-destroying questions and equally stunning answers have Dusty digging deeper than she ever thought possible, and when she discovers her Self in an entirely foreign landscape, she begins anew, more determined than ever to achieve her lifelong dream.

If you love stories about women who pick themselves up, dust themselves off, and get on with living no matter what the universe tosses in their path, this book is for you.